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The Situation Room

News/Business. Wolf Blitzer. Traditional reporting and online resources update international news. New.

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Lance Armstrong 51, Us 24, Joe 15, Cnn 12, Washington 10, Texas 9, Colin Powell 9, America 7, Austin 7, U.s. 6, Geico 6, Sandy 6, Joe Johns 6, Kate 5, David Walsh 5, Dana 4, Aflac 4, Cornell 4, Ocuvite 4, Deidra Walsh 4,
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  CNN    The Situation Room    News/Business. Wolf Blitzer. Traditional reporting  
   and online resources update international news. New.  

    January 15, 2013
    1:00 - 4:00pm PST  

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back to our breaking news, back to these areal pictures over st. louis. there's been a shooting in this college. it's called the stevens institute of business and arts. again, if you're familiar with this area, it's washington avenue. we now know, according to the police, a suspect is in custody. a police officer wouldn't tell us if anyone was dead but we can tell you as far as injuries go, two people are injured. this is according to captain dan
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sutter with the st. louis fire department. says that there are two adult males. they are in critical condition but he wouldn't say if one of the victims was the shooter, wouldn't talk details with either of those injuries and that's what we have so far. thanks so much for being with me. joe johns in the situation room today. hey, joe. >> hey, brooke. happening now, president obama decides to go big on gun reform acting on his own and asking congress for reform that will be hard to pass. we'll hear part of oprah winfrey's reaction to lance armstrong's confession. plus, an exclusive look inside a lab that could save your life. see how close we are to a super vaccine to keep you from getting the flu for years. wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room."
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we begin now with a guessing game about what is in president obama's so called comprehensive proposals to cut down on gun violence. the president and vice president are set to unveil their plans tomorrow and even though officials are trying to keep the deal under wraps, we already know what is in the plan. jessica yellin has been working her sources and joins us live now. what do you know? >> joe, today vice president biden delivered his plan to the president just a month after the newtown shootings and among the top recommendations that the president will unveil tomorrow we're told are enhanced background checks for gun sales of all kinds. the president has outlined two types of paths forward for the
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president. he has told legislators that he is going to give the president 19 different executive actions that the president can take essentially on his own without any congressional action and this could include better enforcement. keeping data on where the guns are. the government stopped keeping those records in 2004 and improving the background check system. so there's more sharing of information. joe, the other path forward would be congressional action and we're told that the president will push for an assault weapons ban and expansion of the gun sales of all kinds. even if i tried to sell you a gun privately, that would require a background check and then limit the sale of high-capacity magazines. those are some of the major issues. we expect to hear the president outline tomorrow, joe.
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>> jess, is this the kitchen sink or are there things they held back on? >> reporter: well, what the president is describing it as is comprehensive and these are issues that they prioritize. i expect that the white house is is going to place a serious emphasis on this high-capacity magazine issue. i'm told that in private meeting the vice president has emphasized that the high capacity magazine could make as much of a difference, more of a difference, maybe, than any other pressure. he has pointed out to multiple people that the gabby giffords shooter used a high-capacity magazine on a handgun. so if an assault weapons ban had been in place, that wouldn't have made a different in the gabby giffords shooting but. the president is outlining this by kids who wrote him in the wake of the sandy hook tragedy.
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>> and you will all be able to watch that on cnn. congress will have to approve the most controversial ideas in president obama's planses to cut gun violence. those are the same lawmakers that have trouble doing anything lately. dana bash joins us now from capitol hill. dana, how are you doing? >> reporter: i'm well. cnn's deidra walsh has learned that the obama administration intends to use the campaign infrastructure in order to galvanize support for the gun control measures he will formally announce tomorrow and talking to members of congress, even democrats, they are going to need it. noumpb, connecticut, is now represented by a freshman democrat determined to ban the weapons used to massacre her young constituents. >> it's my job to advocate for my community and all of these
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other communities. i'll be working with leadership to get the votes we need. >> reporter: but her burst of fresh energy to pass the new gun control proposals is already colliding with political reality. listen to how the democrat who runs the senate is. >> the numbers around the country, most people favor having the ability of people to carry guns. the american people want us to be very cautious with what we do. >> reporter: gun control is still political dynamite. a house gop leadership aide tells cnn the democratic-controlled senate must go first. >> let's be realistic. in the senate we're going to do what we think can get through the house. i'm not going to be going through a bunch of these gyrations to say that we've done something. >> reporter: never mind republicans. gyrations mostly comes from half a dozen vulnerable democrats who represent pro-gun states,
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support for any gun control would immediately put them in the nra's political crosshairs, an organization always looking for new ways to advocate gun rights, like this new app on itunes, a 3-d target practice starting at age 4. >> i don't think this administration's ideas on gun control are the right steps forward. >> reporter: gardener is one of many republicans who will oppose virtually everything the president proposes, even strengthening background checks. is anything that the president will announce with regard to gun control measures likely to pass legislatively? >> i hope that we can work with the president on issues that concern mental health. >> reporter: but what about gun control? >> i don't think gun control is the right direction and i don't believe most of my colleagues would disagree with gun control measures. >> reporter: now, as for the
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nra, joe, they are not saying anything informally or formerly. another thing that cnn's deidra walsh learned is that the nra is going to have a meeting next week with democratic members of the gun task force put together a couple of weeks ago. there is a little bit of a silver lining when it comes to something that we haven't seen a lot around here and that's dialogue. >> the bottom line is that harry reid is concerned about asking democratic members, especially in red states to walk the plank on a sensitive issue like this. >> reporter: that's exactly it. a lot of people look at harry read and know that he is from a pro gun state. he's in nevada. he's a gun owner himself. but it's not necessarily about his politics or personal advocacy for guns. it the political reality that never mind the republicans, democrats, a lot of democrats who are in vulnerable, political situations right now may not want to do anything until, unless they think it can
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actually get to the president for a signature. >> dana bash at the capitol, thanks so much for that. a spokesman for the national rifle association tells cnn there's been an unprecedented spike in membership. about 250,000 new members have signed up. for more on the challenge president obama faces on pushing comprehensive gun reforms through the congress, i'm joined by chief political analyst gloria borger. when you look at this in a nutshell, the question arises early what is better to sort of put a comprehensive wish list out there or to just put out the things you think you can get through first. which is a better choice? >> they are put out there what one white house adviser described to me as a menu of options. and that's because the white house doesn't want to be seen as doing this in a piecemeal way at
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all and also, for example, if you put out the assault weapons ban, which everyone assumes they are going to do and have to do, that if something has to be taken off the table in some kind of a compromise, maybe it's an assault weapons ban but not the ban on high-capacity magazines or closing the loophole for gun shows, for example. so i think the white house understands that if you put out a whole bunch of stuff and you only get some of it, it can then be seen as a success when you do get something through in the end and you're not forcing everyone to vote for everything as dana pointed out, they have problems with democrats in a lot of pro gun states like montana or south dakota or louisiana who are up for re-election. they understand the political reality of this. >> so they want to see what sticks, more or less? >> that's right. and so if you put out a big list, something comes off the table, you can still succeed to a great degree. >> public opinion obviously is a big question here. >> oh, yeah. >> and it sort of shifted over the past few weeks.
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however, that's going to be what drives how much the president can do, perhaps? >> it sure does. and i was on the phone with a democratic pollster who was in touch with members of congress all the time. what he said to me is what they are seeing, sure, the national polls show that more people favor gun control than don't. that may always have been the case, even before newtown. but they are seeing a shift in intensity. the intensity has always been on the side of the national rifle association, the voters who come out and vote on a single issue particular flee a midterm election, particularly what we're coming tochlt he says what they are now seeing and they are hoping for is an intensity, maybe equivalent, they don't know, on the other side, that newtown has really i am mmmobil. he said, we're going to get sheriffs out there, police chiefs, we've got money. new york mayor bloomberg has
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said he's going to put his wallet behind this. they are also going to have the white house grassroots organization behind them, which, as you recall from the last election, was not small potatoes. >> and the other thing is, the assault weapons ban, that was a nasty fight. >> bad. bad. >> and if i remember correctly, the democrats controlled the house then. >> before, yes. >> now the republicans control the house, it's going to be an even nastier fight. >> and lot of democrats are still spooked by something that happened 20 years ago. don't forget, joe biden who was running this was in the middle of that fight, then, too as a senator. so democrats are completely spooked by the gun issue. that's not going to change. what they have to be convinced of is that public opinion has shifted because of newtown and that there are some of these fights, not all of them, some of these fights that they can win. i mean, republicans are worried if they vote for some of these issues, they are going to be primaried by more conservative republicans.
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democrats understand that this may be an opportunity. >> gloria borger, thanks so much for that. >> sure. you're about to hear oprah winfrey's reaction to lance armstrong's admission that he's a cheater. later, does another member of the clinton family have political ambitions? [ male announcer ] how do you measure happiness? by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do.
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after years of very mentally denying it. ed lavandera is in armstrong's home town of austin, texas. ed, what do you know? >> we are in a bike shop called mellow johnny's. we're here because lance armstrong is actually part owner of this bike shop. his yellow jerseys hang on the wall. big posters with his arms up on victory. when we see him on tv in a couple of days, that's not what he will look like. >> for lance armstrong, it was not enough to deny using performance-enhancing drugs. had he to stand on a mountaintop and righteous cannily question anyone how he did it. this was armstrong in paris after winning his seventh tour de france title in 2005. >> to the people who don't believe in cycling, the cynics and the skeptics, i'm sorry for you. i'm sorry you can't dream big and i'm sorry you don't believe
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in miracles. there is no secret. this is a hard sporting event. viva la tour forever. >> which lance armstrong will appear in front of oprah winfrey. her comments so far add to the injury. >> i would say he did not come clean in the manner i expected. it was surprising to me. >> but what does that mean? will armstrong make a full confession and accept full responsibility for his actions? will he bring down others in the cycling industry? or will he be the combative cyclist who, as he has many timeses in the past, complain that he's the victim of a witch hunt? >> i choose not to characterize. i would rather people make their own decision whether he was contrite or not. i felt that he was thoughtful. i thought that he was serious. i thought that he certainly had prepared himself for this moment. >> lance armstrong knows it is
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time to salvage his reputation. veteran political consultant, mark mckinnon, who lives in austin, texas, says he feels betrayed. >> i think he's got a lot of apologies. he's got to drive the sack cloth but i think that the one thing they can't take away from him is his cancer survivorship. >> and for craig staley, a long-time friend, that's what he is he holding on to. armstrong is one of the owners. staley and armstrong have known each other since they were teenagers. >> have you lost faith in him? >> there's still a lot of things that he's done and accomplished outside of the seven tours of france. a lot of people are abandoning him really quickly and i think that -- i think that was in some
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ways a rush to judgment. because i've known the guy a long time and story's not over and he's not finished. >> reporter: but many of lance armstrong's biggest enemies in the cycling world, and there are many, now must feel that they are looking down on the mountain top on him. >> the anti-doping agency says simply sitting down with an interview would not lift the lifetime ban that he faceses because of the report that came back out in october but they said that he will have to sit down under oath and help investigators understand how all of this happened in the cycling industry but a source close to the situation, aware of what's going on of the situation tells cnn that armstrong at this point has no intention of testifying against others in this case. joe, back to you. >> ed lavandera in austin, texas, thanks for that. you just heard a little bit from oprah in ed's piece.
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starting with the wheeling and dealing she did to get the interview. >> yes, i think the entire interview was difficult and may i just say that we had agreed before this moment, before the interview, we had agreed that the term of the interview and what was included in the interview, specifically what was included in the interview would be left for people to make their own judgments about and i would not be discussing or he would not be discussing or confirming. we agreed to that. and by the time i left austin and landed in chicago, you all had already confirmed it. so i'm like, how did you all do that? we all agreed we weren't going to say anything. so i'm sitting here now because it's already been confirmed. >> she also told cbs that armstrong got just a bit emotional at times during the interview. >> i would say there were a
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couple of times where he was emotional but emotional doesn't begin to describe the intensity or the difficulty that i think that he experienced in talking about some of these things. i would say, you know, all the people who are wondering if he actually goes there and answers -- to answer your question that you asked earlier, charlie, nora, and gail, i think that you will come away to understanding that he brought it. he really did. >> oprah also admitted to preparing for her interview by reading author david walsh's books on armstrong. he's one of the first reporters in the world to raise the doping question. walsh joins us in "the situation room" coming up live in our next hour. a victim of last month's shooting in newtown is honored. what one connecticut town is doing to make sure a heroic teacher's legacy lives on.
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in the world to raise the doping
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a connecticut school will be renamed for a sandy hook teacher. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. what do you have?
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>> a school will be renamed after victoria soto. she's the 27-year-old teacher who died trying to shield her students from newtown gunmaned a da adam lanza. >> i'm happy that the town was able to come together and pass this and i'm honored to know that my sister will stay alive and she will never be forgotten. >> soto's mother told cnn victoria loved her students more than life and would, quote, put herself in front of them any day for any reason. in other news, pakistan's supreme court is calling for the arrest of prime minister alleging he took kickbacks. including a well known clear rick trying to flush out the current government. and venezuela officials say
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hugo chavez is responding to treatment and is health is improving. chavez is at a cuban hospital suffering from an lung infection. top members of the government visited chavez over the weekend, including venezuela's vice president. walmart is announcing one of the highest commitments to veterans ever. over the next five years the super store will hire every veteran who honorably left the veteran within the past year. 100 thourk people are expected to find work. over 10%, 3% higher than for nonveterans. so this is probably a good pr movement for walmart but it's a nice thing that they are doing. >> good policy, public relations, everybody wins. >> exactly. >> good to see you, lisa. a rare scene on the floor of house of representatives. lawmakers taking the time to read the entire constitution
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instead of passing laws. was it a waste of time? plus, cnn gets exclusive access into the lab formulating a new super flu shot, taken once and lasts for years. we'll tell you when it might be available. aig? we said we were going to turn it around, and we did. woman: we're helping joplin, missouri, come back from a devastating tornado. man: and now we're helping the east coast recover from hurricane sandy. we're a leading global insurance company, based right here in america. we've repaid every dollar america lent us. everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. for the american people. thank you, america.
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helping people recover and rebuild -- that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today, we're ready for whatever swims our way. ask your doctor about symbicort.
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i got my first prescription free. call or click to learn more. [ male announcer ] if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. i'm joe johns. here are some of the stories we're working on for our next hour. just as one of the largest gun shows takes place in las vegas, we're taking you to a shooting range off the strip like you've never seen before. into plus, coca-cola taking on obesity. our doctor, sanjay gaup ta. and why all of the lies of lance armstrong. stand by. you're in "the situation room."
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joining me for today's strategy session, our democratic strategist cornell belcher and ari fleischer. welcome to you both. as we look at the white house rolling out all of these executive actions they called them, 19 actions relating to different types of gun control and so on, it reminds me of some conversations i had with people in what would you call gun lobby, even before newtown. there are people out there who believe for some time that this president essentially was going to sign a bunch of executive orders removing the rights of people to carry and own guns, throw it all into the courts and sort of fight it out until the president leaves and now it's happened, which raises a question as to whether this was all sort of a self-fulfilling
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prove gue prophecy on the part of the nra and others. i'll ask you first, ari fleischer, what do you think about that? >> the fact of the matter is, the president is constrained. he has the right and all presidents do, through executive orders to take lawful actions allowed by congress. he cannot ban weapons on his own. only congress can do that and the constitution even limits that ability. so the president has the ability through regulatory power to take such actions as tougher background checks, closing loopholes, dealing with some issues involving sharing of information in the government. that's as it should be and i do not see the president, as much as i don't support this president, i don't see him going beyond executive power to do things he does not have the legal right to do. >> cornell, what do you think about the whole notion of the president sitting in the white house planning for four years to
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get rid of guns? >> well, i think it's a silly notion pushed by silly people. look, the president has the authority -- where the president has the authority act to protect the american people, he absolutely should take the authority to protect the american people. what happened in newtown was life altering change for americans. the polls show that. worried about another mass shooting in the community, you see this coming to fruition right now which i think missouri we don't really know what's happening. the ideal that the president shouldn't do or shouldn't take any action to protect the american people after such a tragedy is just as silly as to say that george bush after 911 should sit around and not do anything to protect the american people. the president has a job to protect the american people and he should take that authority and keep us protected. >> i'm going to ask you about the optics of the president's
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announcement on guns. we're told by jay carney today that the president will not only be joined by vice president biden but also by children from around the country who have voiced their concerns about guns. there are those who will say the president will essentially be using children for props. what do you think of that? first to you, ari? what do you think of the notion of children being used as props? >> well, look. there's nothing new here about bringing forward american citizens, whether they are children or adults, to illustrate their point. i don't begrudge him that. i think the most important issue is, one, for the democrats to show a sense of reality. it's very hard to imagine that any gun law has gone to prevent these types of horrors from taking place. the republicans, on the other hand, need to show some sympathy. i also think -- i've heard other people call it a placebo effect, that it's important for us as a
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society to show that we're not going to throw up our hands to say there's zero to be done. i'm mostly interested in the mental health aspect of this. is there anything that the government can do to prevent people that are psychotic criminals from obtaining guns and using guns and being on the street. that's the core of the issue to me. that's what i'd like to see people address. >> cornell, will you weigh in on that? i think ari is right. on ari's side, the language that you're hearing from certain groups of republicans is that they don't want any gun legislation or gun laws at all coming down. and what poll after poll shows is that the majority of americans disagree with that. so republicans can't seem to sit there in their box and look like they don't want any laws or legislation to come down at all because i think there will be a political price to pay for it if they are looking like they don't want anything to change. i think the conscience of america changed that day after that shooting.
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you see even sort of the even democrats in very red states and even some republicans at the senate levels saying, you know, we need to have this conversation open for change. i think people who sit inside their ideological boxes and say no, no, no around this issue where the american people have come to a different conclusion, i think they are going to pay a political price for it. >> i want to ask you on the floor of the house of representatives, the house read the entire united states constitution. it's actually the second time they did it. they did it in 2011 for the first time. the question really is whether this needs to happen every two years with all of the pressing issues that congress has to deal with, shouldn't it be using its time better, ari fleischer? >> joe, i loved it. and i think there's a lack of this in our schools. we don't teach civics that much in schools. and we really don't spend enough time teaching children the basics of the american
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government beginning with the declaration and constitution as well as the bill of rights. i love civic lessons like this. i think it's instructive. i hope a lot of schools pick up what congress is doing today and talk to children about the very same documents and have them read them. >> cornell, quickly? >> you know there's going to be a point where ari and i are going to have a strong disagreement. i strongly disagree. when you look at americans struggling right now and the ideal that they are going to spend this time reading the constitution as opposed to passing legislation or working on issues that are top of mind concerns for working americans, this is why they have approval rating lower than root canal. this is it. they are dysfunctional. >> stand by, guys. it's dysfunctional. >> they should be doing something else, yeah. >> all right. we'll get back to some more stuff in a minute. up next, chelsea clinton's subtle moves. is they eyeing a political career? [ ryon ] eating shrimp at red lobster
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we're back with democratic strategist cornell belcher and ari fleischer, a member of the republican jewish coalition. i want to play you all a clip of former general and former secretary of state colin powell on nbc's meet the press talking about his own republican policy issues dealing with race. listen. >> there's also a dark -- a dark vein of intolerance in some parts of the party. what do i mean by that? what i mean by that is they still sort of look down on minorities. >> this has been a hot topic, certainly all day long. and today conservative radio host laura ingraham saying, liberalism has been an utter disaster for black america. i want you to weigh in on this.
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what do you think of colin powell's statement and then the response from laura ingraham? >> you can't look at the changing face of the american electorate and look at 2008 and this last election cycle and argue that, you know, both political parties have to vy for minority voters and look at the whooping that republicans took at the hand of minority voters and not get the danger here. if i were a republican, this is what i would do. as opposed to attacking colin powell, a war hero, a well-respected leader in this country, as opposed to attacking him, i would sit back, invite him in, and have a conversation with him about what the party can do better to fix this perception that's out there because clearly the perception is out there. look, i did a poll last year for an organization looking at
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african-american issues and what came out is unfavorable ratings was the idea that the republican party was openly os style to their community and their leaders. that's a real issue. and to act as though there's no racial aversion is a conversation that is silly because we clearly know there is. however, i would take colin powell, i would invite him over to the rnc, i would sit down with him and talk about how we fixed this because long term the republican party has to fix this at the national level. >> george w. bush tried to address this head on. what do you think about the controversy now? >> well, frankly, i think that you can look at both parties and find things you don't like. in the republican party it's extremely small sliver. i suspect there's people in the democratic party that have some very old views. i'm disappointed that secretary powell would only look in one direction and that's the
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republicans. i think there's a hostility in much of the liberal wings of the political party towards organized religion. i think it's intolerance of the left twashd people of good faith on the right and that worries me. i wish colin powell had talked about that as well. i wish colin powell had talked about the implications of chunk hagel talking about the jewish lobby that intimidates people. he said, make the jews pay. colin powell could have talked about that and whether that was a dark strain or is his focus only on when republicans act wrong? chuck hagel did, too, in these circumstances. it's a topic worth discussing but needs to be discussed in every direction, not just one. tolerance needs to be taught and practiced by all. >> i think that's -- you know, i've got to say that's the sort of thinking by republicans that, seriously, gets in the way. as opposed to attacking, you know, clearly there's issues
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with the republican party and minorities in this country. >> it's a one-way street. >> a false equivalence about democrats and evangelicals that makes me scratch my head. taking in what colin powell has to say, look at the election results and don't attack him. he could be the leading voice for republicans on this and the leading voice for -- >> you've said that before. you've said that before. >> all right, guys. >> i don't now you can equate that with attacking colin powell when it's reflecting on the wholer issue of toll trans. it does not just asupppply in o direction. >> all right. chelsea clinton wrote a piece about the inauguration day she's heading up. my father reminded us of what king once called the most urgent question. what are you doing for others? there are countless right answer
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for that question. the only wrong one is to do nothing. after staying out of the spotlight, she certainly is beginning to raise her profile. do you think chelsea clinton is going to be running for office? >> i don't know what offices are open. look, any time a child of a president thinks about running or a nephew of a president thinks about running, it lends itself to a little bit of excitement. your last name alone never carries you. >> that's true. however, the name clinton is not a bad one to have. there's not a better name in all of political america than clinton at this time. >> cornell, belcher, ari fleischer, good to see you guys. >> thank you, joe. we're about to get an exclusive look inside a government laboratory where they are coming up with what could be a medical miracle.
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imagine getting one shot that could protect you from the flu for years. like a lot of things, trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work.
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see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you.
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the government's center for disease control says the flu
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vaccine is harder to find now than earlier in the season. the cdc is warning people they may need to contact several praises. now, imagine just getting one shot that protects you from getting any form of the flu for years? brian todd went inside the high-tech lab that's turning the dream into a reality. >> joe, every year the flu is a bad strain of it but government officials are working furiously and this is at the cutting edge. >> it's not a pandemic but a big part of the problem, vaccines that can't keep up with the flu virus. >> why is it as effective?
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>> people get subjected to influenza but the virus itself changes a little bit. it drifts. >> but not like vaccines for polio. he took us inside the lab that could be turning that inside our favor. nih, more than a dozen top minds are developing a universal flu vaccine. >> then you have a vaccine that you can give to someone and not worry about those changes from year to year and you'll have a response you may need to give it every few years, every five years, every ten years but you won't have to give it every year and have to chase after those little changes. >> but fauci says it may mean changes the plan of attack. >> these are proteins, and blown up they look like this.
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the problem with the vaccine, as we know it now, it induces a response that only attacks the head of each hemaglutin which anges from year to year. the plan it to attack not just the head but the stem of the hemaglutin. a crucial step takes place in the tissue culture room. >> we've grown the flu virus in culture and we're taking human blood specimens and asking if we've taught the immune system to attack the antibodies. >> the vaccine won'ter rad indicate the flu. >> but i think you're going to have a significant impact on the incidents of influenza as well
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as the degree of protection. >> how far out are we of people like you and me being able to get this flu vaccine? dr. fauci said it's not going to be next year but not in 40 years. with luck, be ten years down the road and if they can accelerate it, maybe even sooner. joe? >> brian todd reporting from bethesda, maryland. a rocky day for wall street. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. lisa? >> of all of the companies, it's apple's stock that caused the nasdaq to close lower. for the second straight day, the shares dipped below the benchmark for the first time of february of last year. stocks dipped following reports that the company had cut orders for searching iphone parts due to weaker than expected demands for the latest version of the smartphone. facebook is scouring the mass of social network to launch more
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sophisticated searches like who are my friends that live in washington or find photos of me and joe. it is focusing on people, places, and interest pulling data from one billion profiles, 24 billion photos and one trillion connects. and you may hear the name harvey milk san francisco international airport in the near future. openly gay lawmaker plans to introduce legislation to rename the city's airport after milk, one of the first openly guy politicians in the u.s. before killed in 1978. he hopes it will put san francisco back in the spotlight as a, quote, beacon of hope for the lgbt community. and as president obama prepares to be sworn in, his kenyan half-brother is preparing a campaign. yes, he is running for governor of a county in kenya where his and his father was born. his gather gave him the advice to, quote, have thick skin, be
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honest and sincere. they are close. each served as the other's best man at the wedding. who knew that, joe? >> they both have good name recognition. >> with a name like obama. and his campaign name is all on change. so bringing change. isn't that great? >> like brother, like brother. thank you so much, lisa. nearly a million people are coming to washington for president obama's inauguration. see what is being done to ensure that their smartphones don't crash the system. and in our next hour, one of the first reporters in the world to raise doping questions about lance armstrong. dysfunction - dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently.
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we're just six days away from washington's big inaugural day. nearly a million people are expected to witness the public ceremony. chantses a chances are most of them will have a smartphone. sandra endo has been being looking into the extraordinary precautions to ensure that the system doesn't crash. they could come in handy the
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next time there's a big event in your town. sandy? >> that's right. you see them at super bowl parades and disaster zones. temporary towers that can increase communication and with the throngs of people that will descend on the national mall, some service providers are gearing up for the extra demand. >> i, barack hussein obama -- >> it the picture everyone will want to capture. president obama swearing in for a second term and cell phone providers are gearing up for those coming with cameras and smartphones in hand. >> everybody wants to post pictures so that their family can see that they were here. people want to check the weather, people want to check how the transit system is doing and all of the capabilities through apps on their smartphones and tablets. >> the historic 1.8 million people who watched the first
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inauguration but hundreds of thousands will descend on the nation's capital on monday. if you're one in a throng of people here during the inauguration, try posting your photos on facebook and it may be slow going. >> you're going to experience slow data speeds because everybody is trying to do the same thing. they want to be able to talk, they want to be able to send their pictures and their text messages. >> cell phone providers are hoping to prevent service disruptions like four years ago. most people will likely be coming with more than one device. >> we have added capacity to existing cell sites and then we have added temporary locations like we have here. >> service providers also put up temporary towers at other big events like the super bowl and nascar races.
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the extra cell towers ensure for leaving frequencies alone for 911 calls. if you want to share the excitement -- >> text is really the best thing. that doesn't take up much. it can go very quickly and get a response. >> they want people to stay tuned in. and can be used off line to prevent crowding. >> take all of the videos and pictures you want but up load them once you get back home. a sprint's spokesperson said the inauguration is one of the for the best view -- for the best view of the inauguration,
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you don't need to come to washington. tune in to cnn. our live coverage on sunday and monday mornings starts at 9:00 eastern. >> you're in "the situation room" happening now. the cyclist may finally be owning up to his actions but the fallout may just be beginning. as the white house gets ready to reveal its gun control plans, we'll talk -- we'll take to you las vegas, home of the world's largest gun show where gun owners can fire just about anything. and coca-cola launches an ad campaign targeting obesity. but is the maker of sweet drinks focused on weight control or damage control? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm kate bolduan along with joe johns. you're in "the situation room."
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>> first up this hour, an interview with oprah winfrey will not be enough in the wake of news from winfrey where armstrong apparently came clean with her about using performance enhancing drugs during his career. >> the reported confession comes as a bombshell after years of vehement denials. let's bring in lisa siease sylv with details. >> it's one thing to go on and tell all. the next step would be testimony under oath. the international cycling union urged armstrong to testify before the independent commission that has been looking into these allegations but that would be quite a reversal after years of denial. >> listen, i've said it for
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seven years. i have never doped. >> the cynics and the skeptics, i'm sorry for you. i'm sorry you can't dream big and i'm sorry you don't believe in miracles. >> all clean. totally negative. >> for more than a decade, lance looked into cameras and denied developing. said to be the use of his performance enhancing drugs. >> i would say he did not come clean in the manner that i expected. it was surprising to me. i would say that for myself, my team. we were mesmerized by some of his answers. >> the interview is scheduled to air on oprah's show, thursday and friday. she talked about her exclusive interview on cbs this morning. >> i would say there were a couple of times where he was emotional but emotional doesn't begin to describe the intensity or the difficulty that i think he experienced in talking about
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some of these things. >> oprah said armstrong came prepared and, quote, brought it, confession, though, from armstrong could come with a price, legal battles. during his career. >> you are not worth the chair that you are sitting on. >> after his interview with oprah, armstrong could likely face counter lawsuits. the upside for him is the possibility of getting his life time ban in competitive sports lifted. that would allow him to compete in triathlons. but to redeem himself, he may need to give up names to the u.s. anti-doping agency. >> armstrong is in a position where he needs to do where they are not telling him what to do and that is very tough for a guy who makes romney ee man you will rahm emanuel. the team's director, a team
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doctor, and the team trainer is also under investigation by the u.s. anti-doping investigation. this is a huge conspiracy in professional biking and i would think that you need a full and frank disclosure by him before the public considers redemption and forgiveness. >> now, armstrong testified under oath that he didn't use performance enhancing drugs back in 2005. lawyers tell us that aside from the potential lawsuits that armstrong could still, it's still a possibility that he could still face criminal charges of mail fraud or wire fraud if it's something that the department of justice chooses to pursue so these legal battles are just starting, joe and kate. >> lisa sylvester, thank you for that. >> joining us is david walsh.
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he's been covering lance armstrong's developing ak cue can sagss since 1999 and has written three books. david. thank you so much for coming in. i'm sure at some point you thought he would never be coming forward. those who expect him to falter may have a long, long wait. so what was your first reaction when you heard of this interview he was giving and also reports that he confessed to doping? >> well, my feeling is that everything depends on what exactly he said in other words, the level is going to be in the detail and i believe the confession is going to be pretty comprehensive confession lance has been reaching out to people that would have been perceived
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to have been on the other side. so i imagine that he's trying to make a new start and that begins with the proper confession. >> i sense that you don't really trust. did you, by any chance, receive those calls from him? >> no, i did not. but that may or may not have something to do with the fact that my newspaper, the sunday times, is attempting to recoup money that they paid in 2006 arising out of a lawsuit. and perhaps this was the only newspaper in the world at that time consistently asking questions of lance armstrong and we were the ones he was always going to sue. and, you know, the settlement that we made at that time was based on assure ranss from lance armstrong that he didn't dope, would never dope, and we had no right to even question him on that. of course, the truth is now out there and the sunday times, at
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the very least, is entitled to its money back. >> david, it's joe johns. oprah on cbs news wouldn't give detail of the interview. she just guessed that he was ready to start talking about this now. why do you think he came forward at this point? >> my feeling is that he came forward because he's been in a pretty bad place since the truth has emerged and the only way that he can rebuild to begin his life is to make a full confession of all the things he did and i would say a confession won't be enough. he's got to make reparation to the people he wronged. he's got a lot of apologizing to do. i mean, if you consider that lance armstrong speaking under oath in a dallas, texas,
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tribunal in 2005 described his former masseuse as a whore, to do something like that under oath and to me that was perhaps the lowest point in terms of human behavior during what was a very sad and experience. >> but the purpose, then, you think is to start competing again, perhaps in triathlons? that's what is motivating him to come forward now? >> no, i think he needs to rebuild his life, to regain some of the respect or attempt to regain some respect because he's in a very bad place now i mean, how can you be lance armstrong knowing that there are people at you thinking, these are the
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greatest th greatest cheater that the sport has never known. to come back with a full con investigation, that's why we're going to see on thursday evening what we're going to see. >> ahead of this interview with oprah, you along with the sunday times put an ad out in the chicago tribune offering up some suggestive questions that she should ask lance armstrong. we have a graphic here of it. some of the questions included, did you sue the sunday times to shut us up? also, do you accept your line to the cancer community was the greatest deception of all? pretty tough questions. of course, we're not sure what oprah winfrey asked. we do know that she looked to you and your research in preparing for her interview. listen to this. >> i have prepared. i watched all of scott kelly's
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report, tyler hamilton interview, i've read seven deadly sins. i've read l.a. confidential, david walsh's books. >> david, what was the point, the motivation of putting that ad out and also after all this time, does this -- if he acknowledges what you think he will acknowledge, is this vindication? is this redemption for all of your work? >> i don't feel any vindication. from his first in 1999, i was convinced that he was doping. once you started asking questions, the truth became very obvious. in a sense there is no vindication and i do feel tremendous satisfaction for the people who helped me, people
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like these people told the truth. they did it at great cost to themselves. and characters were assassinated and they were in a bad place. so for the truth to come out, it is tremendously satisfied from their point of view. i i'm thrilled that they will get the respect. we wanted to make sure that oprah winfrey knew there were really serious questions to be asked here and the interview had to be a serious journalistic interview. >> at the end of the day, why do you think he got into doping in the first place and then why do you think he lied about it?
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>> he came to europe and decided the only way to be a champion was to dope. and i think that was understandable. after having very serious cancer and, you know, life threatening, according to some reports, i came back from that and put banned performance enhancing drugs in his body. his great defense was, after what i've been through, do you think i would put that stuff in my body and, of course, everybody said, everybody bought that because it was so plausible. so for lance to have actually doped after cancer was a pretty tough thing to do and i think it indicated a win at all costs attitude that was commendable
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and it was a seriously wrong thing to do. >> you were one of the very first people to question lance armstrong. it goes all the way back to 1999. what was it that made you suspicious in the first place? >> my first point of kind of suspicion was watching lance's treatment of a young french rider and there will be people out there, if they were all doping, how wrong -- how can you blame lance and single him out? they all weren't doping and one of the guys who did not dope in 1999 was a young french rider, and he offered the pin that you couldn't win this tour de france in '99 without doping and much of the colleagues resented him saying that. the guy who most resented him saying that was lance armstrong. the guy who bullied him out of the race was lance armstrong.
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and if you were watching that, the simple question i had was, if you believe he was clean and it was obvious to me he was, how could another clean writer be so opposed to him and it was clear that lance armstrong had to be doping to have had that reaction to somebody that was trying to right the race in the right way. >> finally, people will remember you for your work. investigating this and all of your reporting on these allegations over a decade. in the end are you okay with maybe having this lance armstrong story be your legacy? >> i've known for quite some time that this would be the story that will define my work as a journalist. i went after the story because i
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thought it cut to the hard of what is wrong about this. there is an all cost win attitude. if that means duping the public and the journalists that are covering the race and that's what will happen, in this case, it was a particular case because the cancer community was being duped and i thought that went so far down the wrong road that you just had to stand up and fight against it and say how wrong it was. >> david walsh, thanks so much. fascinating discussion. aid to sandy victims was delayed by one round of partisan victory. could more in-fighting delay the next installment? and first on cnn, why drastic cuts could make iran's leaders happy. i got this snapshot thing from progressive,
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two weeks ago house republicans delayed the first vote on financial aid to victims of superstorm sandy. now lawmakers are due to vote on a second bigger aid package but there is still plenty of bickering about spending for sure. listen to this. >> we are asking. we are pleading and we shouldn't have to beg for money for the northeast to be able to survive this tragedy that hit us. >> we have a national interest in getting this region on its feet as quickly as possible. and not only because it's the right thing to do and it certainly is that but because
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it's the smart thing to do. over 13% of our citizens lived in the most affected states damaged by hurricane sandy. >> the rules committee hearing i was told, you have to understand, that's just the way things are done around here. mr. speaker, republicans were supposed to change the way things are done around here. clearly, we have not. >> let's go live to cnn senior correspondent dana bash. clearly a lot of people in the sandy stricten area have been waiting for this money. speaker boehner has said it will make it the priority in the next congress. what is the likelihood that it's going to pass? >> reporter: it's very likely that the full $51 billion left on the table will pass by the end of the day, pass the house and go to the president's desk. they have passed 17 of it and the rest will likely come later.
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there is a but. this is not happening without a pretty significant protest vote that happened a short while ago. a republican amendment that would have offset the spending, $17 billion of the spending with across the board spending cuts. these are pretty steep cuts. if you talk about 17 billion, that's almost the entire agriculture department alone in a year. it really is significant in telling, in the feeling among republicans and it really does illustrate why we are going to have the big fights over the next couple of months to raise the debt ceiling and two-thirds of the republican caucuses voted for this. they want to send a message that they really, really needed it, that they want to cut spending for every doll they put out there, even on disaster relief, which historically has not been required to have an offset. >> and definitely has ruffled feathers in the last congress. all of our viewers i'm sure will
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rememb how new jersey governor chris christie didn't hold back in showing how angry he was at congress, the house, and specifically speaker boehner when the vote was delayed last time. listen to him. this is on january 2nd. >> new jersey deserves better than the due police tea we saw displayed last night. america deserves better than just another example of a government that has forgotten who is the to serve and why. 66 days and counting. shame on you. shame on congress. >> when you listen to that and when you listen to the house floor and sound bites before , s what you're saying why speaker boehner did what he did in the very beginning of january? >> reporter: absolutely. he took the hit. he pulled that bill knowing that he was going to get the kind of criticism that he got from the fellow republicans of new jersey
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and also knowing that if they took that vote at that time, it was effectively a mess because there was so much opposition within his own party to voting for spending, even on something potentially worthy as relief for sandy victims without offsetting it for other spending cuts that. is is a very significant reason why what we're seeing and the gyrations that we're seeing on the house floor, they put it together in a complicated way in order to make sure that it passed but also to give republicans a way to vent their frustration. >> definitely a complicated way but welcome to the house and the senate, i guess. and definitely further evidence of the spending battles to come. dana bash, thank you. >> thank you. the white house and congress has delayed the reckoning over automatic spending cuts but if those spending cuts happen, they will be very painful and military commanders warn it can be very dangerous. here is barbara starr. >> well, joe, if there are
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spending cuts, one of the key questions is who is the big winners? it might be somebody no one in the united states wants to see benefit from it all. >> iran's hardline leaders could be winners if congress enacts $500 billion in mandatory military budget cuts. >> operations, maintenance, and training will be gutted. we'll ground aircraft, return ships to port, and sharply curtail training across the force. >> cnn has learned that in the persian gulf the u.s. navy may be forced to cut back to just one aircraft carrier, not two, watching the oil shipping lanes and being ready to attack iran's nuclear facilities if ordered. >> what it tells iran is that if it's no longer the priority that it has been for years, primarily because they could conduct operations in one location that would tie up the command and control of the carrier battle group. >> leon panetta approved plans
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to keep two carriers in the middle east as often as possible as part of a larger force. >> it is important to maintain our carrier force at full strength and that means that we'll be keeping 11 carriers in our force. >> but even now there are just ten carriers on the west coast, a third is in port and another is in japan and the first casualty could be the uss eisenhower, scheduled to deploy in a few months back to the middle east. one military official told cnn. is the pentagon crying wolf? >> it's serious whether it's a scared tactic or not. it's very serious. it needs to be resolved. >> but if there's no money for the aircraft carriers and fighter jets on the deck, the choices may be grim.
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where do you take your risks? and the question is, what other areas do you leave uncovered. >> it may mean that president obama's second term is characterized by a military force that may be a little too thin around the world. joe? >> barbara starr, that certainly is something for a president to think about who has got his willing see on his mind. thanks so much for that. >> folks may agree that they want -- everyone wants to cut spending and trim the fat where need be. >> someones is going to have to take a hit. still ahead, the controversial battle against obesity.
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dr. sanjay gaup upta is joining with an eye-opening story. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com.
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[ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you.
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the growing battle against obesity in this country has a
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controversial new partner. coca-cola, the world's largest beverage company is launching a new ad campaign targeting what is called the issue of this generation. take a look at this. >> for over 125 years, we've been bringing people together today. we like people to come together on something that concerns all of us. obesity. the long-term health of our families and the country's at stake. we can play an important role. sanjay gupta is joining us. what is the goal of this ad campaign? >> i think some of this is something that they had to do. everyone is talking about this issue of obesity and it's no secret that sugary drinks has been the center of the discussions and in part it's reactive and in part it was a
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long time coming saying that we want to be the solution. >> now, how responsible or should i say irresponsible is soda really? >> well, it's an interesting request. if you look at how much we drink versus a decade ago, and the obesity problem is increasing. and a lot of time don't know how many calories are in a coke. it's about 140 calories. it's an important number. it's nine teaspoons of sugar, as you see here. that's just what we know about the drink overall. we also know that sugary drinks, it's not just the amount but the rate at which you absorb it.
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not just the amount of sugar but the rate at which your body absorbs it. >> joe, one of the things where you and i are obviously talking about this for a few minutes, people will pay a little bit of attention but the message people are starting to hear over and over again from mayor bloomberg, now from coke, we're drinking too much of it. smaller size cans, for example, and if coke, if somebody says
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before they reach for another soda. >> it's always a good idea. thanks so much for that. always good to see you, sanjay gaup ta. >> there's a lot of people out there doing the same thing as me. cringing when you see the 19 teaspoons, one coke, everybody. >> still ahead, as the white house prepares for a vision of gun control, we'll show you the reality in las vegas. a fancy club on the strip.
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the obama administration is ready to uj veil drug proposals dealing with high capacity magazines and strengthening background checks. the president and it will be joined by children who wrote to the president about that shooting rampage. the and they are up to 19 executive executive actions the president could take without congress. >> lawmakers in new york quickly approved tough new additions to the state's already tough gun laws. and strengthen rules from the mentally ill to object staining firearms and also standardizing
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gun licensing. the largest gun show is under way in. >> reporter: this is a place very comfortable as the world's largest trade show for gun owners. and everywhere in this town, including that and the convention hall, they are waiting to see what happens in washington tomorrow. >> my god. >> reporter: go big or go home, as they say in vegas and one of a kind weapon that can now be fired right on the vegas strip. >> this is the place for the gun connoisseur. >> yes. a higher end demographic. >> it's the sort of things
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dreams are made of and it's here, too. attending the show in town hoping to find new sources of ammunition and is in short supply. >> it's because certain people have a fear with what they perceive the ammunition and gun owners are adding up to ar-15s in record numbers. >> 80% of your business and i sold them in 36 hours. >> they also sold 21 hundred high capacity magazines and and
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this is a place perfectly and you can even go to the state-of-the-art clark county shooting range opening this week. we got a sneak peak. and gun cards and gun owners, and anything goes. sports don't think the new gun laws will have much effect on them but retailers and manufacturers of guns and watch and wait and worried. >> and that's really where we are seeing the concern here. and the manufacturers of the ar-15s say that they have a
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two-year wait and ammunition is selling out before it gets to the store. back to you guys. >> miguel marquez erk thanks for that. new details about why lance armstrong hid the doping for so long. the psychology is next. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional
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let's get back to our top story. lance armstrong reporting to years of doping after emphatically denying it. >> joining us to talk about this is legal contributor and gail saltz, the psychology of living a lie. the 30,000 foot view is here is a guy that told a big lie over and over again on the biggest stage possible. what's going through a person's mind to sort of pull this off for as long as he did? >> well, unfortunately, we're seeing a lot of this and there are two possibilities. and i would say really only lance armstrong knows. one is that powerful, powerful denial can be employed when
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someone is afraid of being found out, doesn't want to admit to themselves that they've done something terribly, terribly wrong, and so denial can reach almost psychotic proportions where you just convince yourselves that what you're doing is right and in that case, lying. the other possibility is that you're sociopathic, that you don't feel guilt, you are not concerned about those you might be hurting. you feel justified to get what you want and you're really not concerned about the consequence and so manipulatively you will do whatever you need to do. for instance, in this case it would be fame and money. >> and, gail, it's one of those things that people are looking at this and it's not just that he denied it for so long. it was this position that he took of how dare you even question me. he went so much further than denying it. he went on the attack.
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you said it could be a defense mechanism. is it a coping mechanism. he knew deep down if he confesses that he is lying. >> i think very often when people are afraid or very disturbed about something, particularly men, they may appear angry and we don't know whether that's really anger or sort of this mounted, puffed up, i'm going to appear so angry that it's going to force you to back off because i'm really afraid of being discovered. and i think that we've seen this in many of the recent cases of men who have been caught doing something, politicians, et cetera, be that if they are uncovered that they are going to lose everything and the fear of losing everything, they appear defensively, highly angry, attacking, aggressive, an attempt to make people back off. >> and, paul, obviously it's a challenge to try to psycho analyze a guy like this because so much more is not known. but one of the things a number
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of people have talked to me about is the competitive nature of lance armstrong. how much do you think that played into this big lie? >> well, joe, you know, with all due respect to the psychiatric profession, we have two words, it's called fraud and perjury. the -- telling a lie under oath which he -- if -- and by the way, we have to say, we still don't know precisely what he is going to say on the oprah show and i don't want to jump to too many conclusions because my bet is he will parse his words very, very carefully. but if he admits to doping, which is the use of human blood to enhance capability and the use of other drugs, that would indicate that he permitted perjury in 2005 in a deposition under oath, that's a crime. i don't think people who are competitive are more inclined to commit crimes. i think this is something you've got to look not to competition
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but to his own inner psyche that would make him do this. when you look at his conduct, he was so aggressive in attacking his teammates, accusing them of being liars and perjurers when it's now readily apparent that he was probably telling the truth. it is true it may be criminal conduct but may arise from some underlying problem that he has. >> but the question is, if you get into a situation like this, what's the defense? what's the public defense for him and what's the legal defense? >> well, he's got a great defense to criminal charges. it's called the statute of limitations. he lied under oath arguably in texas in 2005. if he admits this to oprah tomorrow. and the statute of limitations is gone on that. that leaves one possible area of wire fraud. if you do and engage in a fraudulent act and you use a
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telephone, the mail, or even television transmission wires to help you in the fraud you commit a federal crime but the last time he was accused of doping, his last race was in 2009. the other allegations go back even farther than that. he may be out of the statute of limitations for federal wire fraud and i'm sure he's discussed it very carefully with his attorneys and decided that although he faces criminal charges, they are unlikely. that leaves the civil charges. those are going to be serious. sponsors who paid millions of dollars for his good name undoubtedly had moral clauses in those contracts and they were deceived and they can sue to get their money back claiming fraud. you could be looking at millions of dollars of civil lawsuits again him if he admits to engaging in this illegal conduct. >> unfortunately, we are going to have to leave it there.
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much more to be talking about this in the days to come. guys, thank you so much. >> thank you, kate. still ahead, 20 surgeries, 36 plates and 46 screws. up next, what happened to this girl could easily happen to anyone. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just making her comfortable. one night britta told me about a tradition in denmark, "when a person dies," she said, "someone must open the window so the soul can depart." i smiled and squeezed her hand.
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you know you're not supposed to do it, but taking your eyes off the road, even for a moment, can have a devastate impact. >> and cnn's sandra endo is here. you actually climbed into a simulator to sort of illustrate all of this. >> yeah. and it was very surprising, joe and kate, just what could happen, if you take your eyes off the road, just for a few seconds. really, it just shows, also, how deadly cell phones could be or any type of distraction inside your car. and it happened to me in a simulator. but we also spoke with one woman who shared with us her tragedy real-life story. if this picture doesn't say enough, listen to 24-year-old amanda clear explain what happened to her in 2008. >> i was in a very bad accident. i hit the back end of a tractor-trailer that had a forklift on it, and i've had over 20 surgeries to repair my face. i lost an eye, snapped an ankle,
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i have 36 plates and 48 screws on the right side of my face. i had to learn how to rewalk. i was in a coma. i was distracted. i was texting and playing with my phone. >> she considers herself lucky to be alive. clear was like many teens, who are five times more likely to text and drive. that's according to the cell phone industry, which has teamed up with the government to promote awareness. >> teens have a higher tendency to take more risks behind the wheel. we all know that. because they do live a connected lifestyle, is being able to sort of break that cultural more of, it's okay, it can wait. put it down. >> the department of transportation has found that sending or receiving a text takes the driver's eyes off the road for more than five seconds, and at 55 miles per hour, that's blindly drivie ing the length on entire football field. i got behind the wheel of one simulator that does much more than just teach the rules of the
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road. >> going on to a freeway here, and have my blackberry in sight. someone's texting me. "you're not driving, are you?" "yes, i am." so i crashed? >> it was just at the time that you -- >> that i looked away. >> reporter: the system also teaches repercussions. >> $2,000 to fix my car?! oh, my goodness. >> you now have to live through a first-person experience of going in front of an actual judge and being arraigned and being sentenced for what you did. and that's not a comfortable feeling. and people going through this really remember that feeling. >> reporter: from someone who has experienced the worst, clear has this message for young drivers. >> whatever it is that you want to do that's a distraction can wait. it's not worth it. and you never, ever want to know what it feels like to be in my shoes and my kind of lucky.
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>> now, keep in mind, distractions could mean a variety of things, not just texting or talking on the phone, it could be eat organize drinking, using a gps, or grooming or even changing the radio station. >> when you look at that, we all know it, we all know that it's dangerous, but we've all done it as well. >> it really brings it home. and also, i assume, those pictures, you couldn't show all of them, because -- >> right, they're pretty graphic. and we tried to not show the most graphic ones, but just looking at the mangled car itself shows you the impact of what could happen when you text and drive. >> sandra endo, thank for that. >> thanks, sandra. a chance to experience history and a chance for a financial windfall. why the upcoming presidential inauguration manes different things to different people. tha. tha. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups.
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they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's a huge moment in history, and for many, an opportunity to cash in. cnn's emily schmidt has more on the presidential inauguration. >> reporter: an inauguration comes down to this. one hand on a bible, the other raised in an ath. >> i do solemnly swear. >> reporter: that's the moment in history which makes so many others try to get their hands on
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this. >> how many different ways can you say you support obama? >> reporter: the presidential inaugural committee store is up and running. ready for shoppers marking the occasion with officially sanctioned, made in the usa, memorabilia. what are you seeing that you like? >> i like everything. and that's my problem, because, just being such an historic event, i want to have a lot of merchandise to share and a lot of merchandise to give other people who could not, you know, come and visit. >> reporter: it is likely president obama will take the oath of office on what will be a cold january day, so people are stocking up on warm sweatshirts and these official hats, even some official blankets. the one thing sold out today, the official tube socks. they're coming in tomorrow. but people point out, still available online. washington is preparing for an expected crowd of about 900,000 people. they'll need to eat, so about 100 permits have been issued for
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food trucks and vendors, down from the first obama inaugural, but three times as many as the second president bush event. in business, it's all about location. and right here, one block from the white house, it doesn't get much closer to the president. these vendors are preparing for big crowds. they've got 60 of these witness to history t-shirts ready to go. their challenge, they have to sell now, because by monday, the day of the inauguration, they'll have to move farther away for security reasons. >> i got the e-mail saying i was selected to be a volunteer. i was excited, ecstatic. >> reporter: sylvia norris will be an inaugural volunteer monday. she hasn't been told yet what she will be doing. she says it doesn't matter, as long as she's there making the same memories others are paying so much to have. >> if i could afford it, i would do it. why not? it's all part of history. >> members of congress are passing out their allotted free tickets to the inaugural swearing in ceremony, but if you
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look online, there are plenty of offers for tickets on sites like craigslist and ebay, prices ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars. kate? >> emily, thank you. happening now, oprah winfrey speaks out about her interview with lance armstrong and how he surprised her. we talk to the man who was uncovering the truth about armstrong before anyone wanted to hear it. will the gun you own be outlawed? the white house is ready to reveal its gun control plans. we'll go inside the lab working on a flu shot that could last years. and we'll talk to a republican leader threatening a government shutdown. plus, a stolen train off the rails and straight into a house. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm kate balduan lang with joe johns. you're in "the situation room."
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new details of lance armstrong's highly anticipated interview with oprah winfrey from oprah herself. she's offering intriguing clues about their lengthy conversation. >> but owinfrey isn't revealing exactly what armstrong said about doping, although she hints he did make some sort of confession. cnn's ed lavendera has the latest from austin. ed? >> reporter: joe and kate, we are in mellow johnny's bike shop in the heart of downtown austin, texas. this is a bike shop that is partly owned by lance armstrong. this is a place he still has many friends, a place of refuge, considering everything that is swirling around lance armstrong right now, and it's also a place you can find his picture still on the wall, his arms up in victory. but when we see him in a couple of days in that interview before oprah winfrey, his arms will not be like that. for lance armstrong, it was not enough to deny using performance enhancing drugs. he had to stand on the
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mountaintop and righteously challenge anyone who questioned how he did it. this was armstrong in paris after winning his seventh tour de france title in 2005. >> to the people that don't believe in cycling, the cynics and the skeptics, i'm sorry for you. i'm sorry you can't dream big. and i'm sorry you don't believe in miracles. there are no secrets. this is a hard sporting event and hard work wins it. so via la tour, forever. >> reporter: so the question is, which lance armstrong will appear in the 2 1/2-hour interview with oprah winfrey? her comments so far only add to the intrigue. >> i would say he did not come clean in the manner that i expected. it was surprising to me. >> reporter: but what does that mean? will armstrong make a full confession and except full responsibility for his actions? will he bring down others in the cycling industry? or will he be the combative
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cyclist, who as he has many times in the past, complain that he is the victim of a witch hunt. >> i choose not to characterize. i would rather people make their own decisions about whether he was contrite or not. i felt that he was thoughtful. i thought that he was serious. i thought that he, certainly, had prepared himself for this moment. >> reporter: lance armstrong knows it is time to salvage his reputation. veteran political consultant mark mckinnon, who lives in austin, texas, and sits on the board of the live strong foundation, says he feels betrayed. >> i think he's got a lot of apologies, i think he's got to crawl over a lot of broken glass and drag the sack cloth. but i think the one thing that they can't take away from his, john, is his cancer survivorship. and he does -- that story gives great hope to millions of people. >> reporter: and for craig staley, a long-time friend of lance armstrong, that's what he's holding on to. stehly runs mellow johnny's bike
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shop in austin. armstrong is one of the owners. stehly and armstrong have known each other since they were teenagers. have you told him, have you lost faith in him? >> there's still a lot there. you know, there's stilt a lot of things that he's done and accomplished outside of the seven tours de france. a lot of people are sort of abandoning him really quickly, and, i think that was, in some ways, a rush to judgment. because i've known the guy a long time, and the story's not over and he's not finished. >> reporter: but many of lance armstrong's biggest enemies in the cycling world, and there are many, now must feel like they're the ones standing on the mountaintop, looking down on him. but it's not clear what a full confession to oprah winfrey will get for lance armstrong. the world anti-doping agency says it won't be enough to go in an interview setting and confess to have to doped throughout your cycling career. that agency is calling for lance
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armstrong to testify under oath, and anything short of that will not affect his lifetime ban from sports around the world. joe and kate, back to you. >> ed lavendera in texas. the white house will unveil its plans to fight gun violence tomorrow, just one month since the connecticut school massacre that made the issue a priority for president obama. cnn white house chief correspondent jessica yellin has the details. jessica, what are you hearing? >> reporter: hi, joe. i've spoken to a number of democrats who met with the vice president and his guns task force, and they tell me they believe there are two proposals the president will lay out tomorrow that both have the greatest chance of passing congress and the chance to do the most good. a measure to pass universal background checks for all gun purchases and an effort to ban high-capacity magazines. at the white house, they're ready to unveil their list of gun safety priorities. >> the president and vice president will hold an event here at the white house to unveil a package of concrete
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proposals to reduce gun violence and prevent future tragedies like the one in newtown, connecticut. >> reporter: this comes just a month after the newtown shootings and weeks after the president named vice president biden to head a task force on gun safety. >> their task is going to be to, you know, sift through every good idea that's out there, and even take a look at some bad ideas before disposing of them, and come up with a concrete set of recommendations in about a month. >> reporter: the president will announce his proposal, surrounded by children who wrote him in the wake of sandy hook tragedy. and they're prepared for a fight. >> the president's committed to pushing these proposals. he is not naive about the challenges that exist. >> reporter: multiple sources tell cnn the vice president told lawmakers he'll outline 19 actions the president can take without going through congress. examples, better enforcement of existing gun laws, keeping data
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on where the guns are. the government stopped keeping records in 2004. and improving the background check system, so there's more sharing of information and prosecution of people who try to buy guns illegally. then, the president will call on congress to take action, to pass an assault weapons ban, expand the background checks law to apply to all gun sales, and limit the sale of high-capacity magazines. >> will all of them get through this congress? i don't know. but what's uppermost in my mind is making sure i'm honest with the american people and with members of congress about what i think will work. >> reporter: now, joe, cnn has learned the vice president has spoken with a number of families of newtown victims, this after some of them were critical of the vice president for not reaching out to them sooner. but he has now done so. we have also learned that among the other measures that the
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white house will press is for a tightening of laws regarding gun swaps. these are regulations that would prohibit, for example, me from selling you a gun privately, with no record of it, no transaction, and no background check. joe? >> chief white house correspondent jessica yellin, thanks. it's going to be an uphill fight for the president, but we're getting some new information about his battle plans. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is on capitol hill looking into that. dana, what are you picking up from there tonight? >> reporter: well, part of the battle plan, according to the vice president himself, he told congressional democrats yesterday that they intend to use the infrastructure from the president's campaign to try to galvanize support for the proposals that jessica was just reporting on. our deidra walsh was told this by one of the members who was at that meeting. and based on the conversations that we've had with members of congress all day, even democrats, they're going to need that infrastructure. newtown, connecticut, is now represented by a freshman
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democrat, determined to ban the weapons used to massacre her young constituents. >> it's my job to advocate strongly for my community and for all these communities. that's what i'll be doing and working with leadership to get the votes we need. >> reporter: but her burst of fresh energy to pass the president's new gun control proposals is already colliding with political reality. listen to how lukewarm the democrat who runs the senate is. >> the numbers around the country, most people favor having the ability of people to carry guns. the american people want us to be very conscious of what we do. >> reporter: gun control is still such political dynamite, a house gop leadership aide tells cnn the democratic-controlled senate must go first, yet the senate majority leader, a gun owner himself, won't yet commit to any legislation. >> let's be realistic. in the senate, we're going to do what we think can get through the house. we're not going to be going through a bunch of these gyrations just to say we've done something. >> reporter: never mind
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republicans. harry reid's reluctance to go through, quote, gyrations, mostly comes from some half a dozen vulnerable senate democrats up for re-election next year, who represent pro-gun state. support for any gun control would immediately put them in the nra's political crosshairs, an organization always looking for new ways to advocate gun rights, like this new app on itunes, a 3-d target practice game. >> i don't think that this administration's ideas on gun control are the right steps forward. >> reporter: gardner is one of many republicans who will oppose virtually everything the president proposes, even strengthening federal background checks. >> reporter: from the perspective of house republicans, is anything that the president will announce with regard to gun control measures likely to pass legislatively? >> i hope that we can work with the president on issues that concern mental health. >> reporter: but what about gun control? >> i don't think gun control is
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the right direction and i believe most of my colleagues in the house republican conference would disagree with gun control measures. >> reporter: and when it comes to the nra, they are staying mum until the president and the vice president formally make their announcement tomorrow. we do expect a statement then. but there is one interesting note that we heard again, our deidra walsh was told this today. that members of the nra intend to meet with democratic members of the house task force next week about potentially, potentially coming up with something that they can all agree on. >> yep, this is definitely one of those issues that seems to be less a matter of party and more a matter of geography, at least this time. dana bash, thank you so much. the gunfight isn't the only battle on the horizon. the debate over debt and spending also promises to be bruising. will republicans go as far as a government shutdown? we'll talk to a top republican lawmaker who questions whether it could be necessary. plus, the journalist who raised doping questions about lance armstrong more than a decade ago
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tough talk from both sides ahead of the coming battle on debt limits and spending. >> president obama says when it comes to paying what congress has already spent, there's no negotiating. >> and republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> let's talk about that and more with congressman cathy
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mcmorris rodgers of washington state. she's a member of the republican leadership in the house. she's chairman of the house republican conference. congresswoman, thanks for coming in. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> of course. i wanted to get your reaction to what the president said there. his point that hays driving over and over again that this is not about authorization new spending and all of this is about paying bills that we've already racked up. so how do you counter that? >> it's the wrong analogy. this is about the credit card being maxed out, and then we're going to the credit card company, and asking to raising that limit even farther. we are talking about future spending. and it is a debate that needs to happen. we need the president to get serious about the out-of-control spending, the record debt that we've accumulated as a country. and we need the federal government to stop spending money that it doesn't have. >> i understand that you are making, republicans are, making an argument about cutting
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spending. but when it comes to the debt ceiling, the debt ceiling, by definition, isn't about authorization new spending. it is about paying the bills that we have already racked up. so are you just trying to say that you want to have this conversation together, at the same time? >> this is about, this is -- raising the debt ceiling is like raising your credit card limit. and historically, this has been a debate. you look over the last four presidents in this country, and there's been a debate, every time, it has come to raising the debt ceiling. because there's a recognition, for years now, that the federal government has been spending way more than it should, way beyond its means, much more than it's actually bringing in. and now, it is -- we cannot continue to kick this can down the road. we've come to the end of the road. it is time for us to stop spending money we don't have. >> former republican speaker newt gingrich is not exactly conflict averse, i think you'd agree, and he has warned the house republicans not to take up
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this debt ceiling fight. listen. >> asking barack obama not to be a big-spending, high-taxing liberal is a denial of everything that we've learned about him in his career. it's much better for the house republicans to say, this is what we're prepared to do. there are dozens of places you can dramatically change spending without having to get involved in a general crisis over the u.s. debt. >> does he have a point? do you think this is a message from the former speaker that's worth heeding? >> well, we definitely want to work with president obama, and we're at the beginning of the 113th congress. i would also say that this is our moment, though. the american people know that our economy is struggling right now, partly because of the debt that is impacting american families, hard-working taxpayers all across this country. when president obama was in the senate, when he was a u.s. senator, he voted against raising the debt ceiling. and he said it was a lack of leadership that had brought us
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to this point. and so i would, at the beginning of this congress, hope that the president would make this a new start, where we could look at this, and that we'll actually get a budget in place. the senate hasn't passed a budget now for four years. the president, unfortunately, yesterday, said that he's going to delay his budget. even though the law says that he's supposed to submit the budget by february 4th. that is concerning to me. that we are on auto pilot. that the federal government continues to grow, continues to -- we're continuing to spend more money, and we need the president to join in this effort to get our fiscal house in order. >> you're quoted in telling politico that a government shutdown seems surely possible. you said in part that i think it's possible that we would shut down the government to make sure president obama understands that we're serious. and the point president obama is making, and has been making, especially this week, is that house republicans are holding
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the american people hostage to prove a political point. i mean, do you see a government shutdown on the horizon? because it's hard to argue with that point that the president's making. because the american people don't like gridlock, and they sure don't want to see the government shutdown. >> no one wants to see the government shut down. but what we need is for the president to get serious about addressing the out of control spending. under president obama, we have spent more money -- he has spent more money than any other president in this history. actually, the combined total from washington up to george w. bush. president obama has racked up more spending, $1 trillion deficits. and it's time that he join us in this effort to get our fiscal house in order. what is a drag on the economy is the spending. that is what is hurting hard-working taxpayer right now. and so we need him to join us in this effort. >> at the end of the day, this is going to be a question about public opinion. what makes you think talking
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about not raising the debt ceiling or shutting down the government, what have you, is a winner in the court of public opinion? >> well, again, we don't want to shut down the government, but in the court of public opinion, people also know that the federal government and the out of control spending is unsustainable. and large majorities of the american people want us to cut spending, to start making the tough decisions, to balance our budgets, start living within our means. the american people, in their own families, they understand that you have to do that. you have to make the tough decisions. you have to get your budget, you've got to put it in order. and they expect their elected officials and their leaders to do likewise. and that's what needs to happen over the next few weeks, as we approach all of these fiscal debates. >> so you think, it's possible that there could be a shutdown of the government, but you're saying, you don't want to shut down the government? >> no, we don't want to shut
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down the government. what we want is for the president to get serious. and as i mentioned earlier, we don't even have a budget in place. to think that we are running the federal government, this $3.7 trillion enterprise, without a budget, just -- i think it blows most people's minds. it blows my mind. we need to get a budget in place. we need the senate to pass a budget. we need the president to at least a propose a budget. that's pretty foundational. and the ways that we leverage and make this happen comes at points like this, where we're raising, where we're talking about the, raising the debt ceiling, the sequestration, and the continuing resolution. >> unfortunately, congresswoman, i think we'll have to leave it there. i think everyone would debris, it would be great to see a budget pass congress, but i think right now, everybody's a little bit more worried about facing the debt ceiling crises, yet again.
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congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers, thank you so much, we'll definitely be talking with you a lot. thank you. >> thank you. still ahead, a stolen train goes flying off the tracks and right into a house. surprising details of who police say is to blame.
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a stolen train crashes into a house. here's a look at more of the day's top stories. just take a look at this. an incredible scene in stockholm. people say a young woman stole this train in the middle of the night and drove it at dangerously high speeds to the end of the line. that's where it flew off the track and into this house, we'll show you. no one on the inside was hurt and no passengers were on the train, but the young woman was seriously injured. police are investigating just how she got the key to the train. good question. first lady michelle obama is praising walmart for its plan to put veterans to work. the company announced today it will hire more than 100,000 veterans over the next five years. the jobless rate among former service members is almost 11%. compare that to 7.5% for people who are nonveterans. mrs. obama is challenging other businesses to follow walmart's lead. and as president obama
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prepares to be sworn in, his kenyan half-brother is preparing a campaign. ma'lik obama tells cnn he's running for governor of a county in kenya where his and the president's father was born. he says president obama gave him the advice to, quote, have thick skin, be honest, and be sincere. ma'lik and president obama are quite close. each served as the other's best man at their weddings. good luck to him. facebook is unveiling a very cool new feature it's calling graph search. it scours the massive social network to answer more sophisticated searches, like, who are my friends living in washington, and maybe find photos of kate and joe, if you so choose. for now, graph search focusing on four main areas, people, photos, places, and interests, pulling data from 1 billion profiles, 24 billion photos, and 1 trillion connections. it is amazing how much is on the facebook, joe. >> it is. he covered lance armstrong and doping allegations for more than a decade. his paper was even sued for
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libel. sports writer david warble lsh here to talk about the exploding scandal. >> how could you be lance armstrong and walk into a room now, knowing that there were people looking at you thinking, this is the greatest cheat that sport has ever known. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health.
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a sit-down interview with oprah winfrey alone won't be enough to ease sanctions against disgraced cyclist, lance armstrong. that's the world from the world anti-doping agency in the wake of news that armstrong apparently came clean about using performance enhancing drugs during his career. >> the reported confession comes after years of vehement denials
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and could have serious implications for armstrong's future and his former teammates. joining us now is "new york times" sports reporter, juliette mccur. she's covered the doping scandal extensively for years. so this is just quite an amazing story. what are you hearing now about how far he actually went in this interview with oprah winfrey? >> well, we know for sure that he's said he's doped, which is really quite a revelation, after even, it's been 15 years of his vehement denials of that. how far he goes, we don't know. we don't know if he's going to talk about the secretive blood transfusions or the needles of the blood booster epo, which increases endurance, all the nitty and gritty and dirty of the sport, i don't -- >> testosterone. >> testosterone, human growth hormone, cortizone. >> because people think this is just about blood doping, but there's a lot of other performance enhancing drugs that are alleged to have been involved. >> sure. and that's exactly why the u.s.
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anti-doping agency has said it was one of the most sophisticated, professional, and organized doping schemes in the history of sports. it's not just, they weren't just using one banned item. they were using the cocktail of banned items that made them or helped them win seven years in a row. >> and juliette, you have been doing some fabulous reporting on a very tough story to really decipher the facts from the spin, i'm sure. so what do you know and what are you hearing about what the motivation is, the big question everyone's havocking now, what was his motivation for coming forward to do this interview and admitting to doping? >> well, on oprah on thursday, i'm not sure what lance armstrong will say his motivation is, but we've heard, from our sources, that the motivation is really, he wants to compete again. he hasn't competed for a long time, because he's been banned from every olympic sport. that means he obviously can't compete in the olympics. but he also can't compete in any sport that is sanctioned by the world anti-doping agency, which is almost any sport you could think of.
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it's a triathlon, it's a local race in your hometown, it's all of those things. >> it sure sounds like coming forward brings more legal trouble than it doesn't. >> that's for sure. a lot of people are asking me, why would he come forward if it means maybe tens of millions of dollars in lawsuits against him he'd have to pay out? but what they don't understand against lance armstrong is, he is not motivated because he wants to be rich. he is not motivated by the cars or mansions that he owns. he is motivated because he's an athlete. he's motivated because he likes to beat people in an athletic competition so he needs to compete again. >> the world anti-doping agency released a statement about this interview. i want to read part of it to you. "only when mr. armstrong makes a full confession under oath and tells the anti-doping authorities all he knows about doping activities, can any legal and proper process for him to seek any reopening or reconsideration of his lifetime ban commence." so this means that this interview with oprah really only
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opens the door enough to make a much fuller and complete statement if he expects to get back into the game. >> sure. this is really just the first step, like a pr step, pretty much, going on oprah, who's known to be pretty soft when it comes with the questions, you know, he's pretty much going to be able to control part of the interview. but what he has to do is turn on the people who helped him dope, which are officials in cycling, maybe at usa cycling, maybe at the international cycling union, which is the world governing body of the sport, maybe going up as high as the international olympic committee. >> and real quick, but i think a lot of this loses focus on the charity, the livestrong foundation. real quick, what kind of impact has all of this had, would you think this admission would have on that foundation? >> the admission, i'm not sure how it will affect the foundation from here on how, but we had a story in "the times" this week that says a lot of corporate sponsors have either scaled back their donations to the foundation or had ended them completely. so the foundation has been hurt badly by it.
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>> i think that's the saddest part. >> it is, it's a sad part, it's a sad story, actually. >> juliette macur, thank you so much. more on armstrong next, the sports editor of the london sunday times joins more than a decade ago, where he saw a world champion start out taking the heat. >> from the moment lance won his first tour de france in 1999, i was convinced that he was doping. plus, a single flu shot that could protect you for years. we go inside the lab where researchers are working on it right now. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful.
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was it a confession, an admission, or something else? oprah winfrey won't say exactly what lance armstrong told her about doping. >> but oprah did say as part of her research, she read a key book from a man who's researched armstrong for more than a decade. joining us from london issed david walsh, chief sports writer for the sunday times. he's been covering lance armstrong's doping accusations since 1991 and has written three books on the subject. his latest is "seven deadly
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sins: my pursuit of lance armstrong." david, thanks so much for coming in. i mean, after covering him for more than a decade now, i'm sure, at some point, you thought he would never be coming forward. you even wrote at one point, those who expect him to falter may have a long, long wait. so what was your first reaction when you heard of this interview he was giving and also reports that he confessed to doping? >> well, my feeling is that everything depends on what exactly he said. in other words, the devil is going to be in the detail. i believe that the confession is going to be a pretty comprehensive confession. i mean, lance has been reaching out to people, journalistic adversa adversaries, you know, people that would have been perceived to have been on the other side. so i imagine that he's trying to make a new start and that begins with the proper confession. >> i sense that you don't really
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trust it. and you said, devil's in the details, until you hear it for yourself. did you, by any chance, receive one of those calls from him? >> no, i did not. but that may or may not have had something -- may have something to do with the fact that my newspaper, the "sunday times" is attempting to recoup money that they paid to lance armstrong in 2006, arising out of a lawsuit. the "sunday times" was perhaps the only newspaper in the world at that time, consistently asking questions of lance armstrong, and we were the ones he was always going to sue. and, you know, the settlement that we made at that time was based on assurances from lance armstrong that hi didn't do, would never dope, and we had no right to even question him on that. of course, the truth is now out there. and the "sunday times," at the very least, is entitled to its money back. >> david, it's joe johns. oprah this morning on cbs news wouldn't give details of the
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interview, and she just guessed that he was ready to start talking about this now. why do you think he came forward at this point? >> my feeling is that he came forward because his -- he's been in a pretty bad place since the truth has emerged in his story. and the only way he can begin to rebuild his life is to make a full confession of all the things he did. and i would say, a confession won't be enough. he's got to make reparation to the people he wronged. he's got a lot of apologizing to do. i mean, if you consider that lance armstrong, speaking under oath, in a dallas, texas tribunal in 2005 described his former masseuse as a whore, i
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mean, to do something like that, under oath, to me, that was perhaps the lowest point in terms of human behavior during what was a very sad experience. >> but the purpose, then, you think, is to start competing again? perhaps in triathlons? that's what's may have totivati come forward now? >> no, i don't think that's the primary motivation, although it's certainly an ancillary motivation. he just begins to rebuild his life. he's in a very bad place right now. how could you be lance armstrong and walk into a room now, knowing that there were people looking at you, thinking, this is the greatest cheat that sport has ever known and he hasn't even admitted it. so, you know, for lance to come back, it had to begin with a full confession.
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and that's why we're going to see on thursday evening, what we're going to see. >> ahead of this interview with oprah, you, along with the "sunday times," put an ad out in the "chicago tribune," offering up some suggestive questions that she should ask lance armstrong and we have a graphic here of it. some of the questions included, "did you sue the "sunday times" to shut us up? "also, "did you suggest that lying was your greatest deception of all?". we know that looked to you and your research in preparing for her interview. listen to this. >> i had prepared, i'd read the reason decision, i'd watch all of scott pelly's reports, "60 minutes" reports, i'd seen the tyler hamilton interview, i'd read "seven deadly sins," i read "l.a. confidential," david walsh's books.
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so, david, what was the point, what was the motivation of putting that ad out. also, after all this time, if he acknowledges what you think he will acknowledge, is this vindication? is this redemption for all of your work? how do you feel about it? >> i don't feel vindication. that's the first point. because i never felt in this story that there was any possibility that i was wrong. from the moment lance won his first tour de france in 1999, i was convinced that he was doping. i started asking questions, and once you started asking questions, the truth became very obvious. >> at the end of the day, why do you think he got into doping in the first place? and then why do you think he lied about it? >> i think he got into doping because he came to europe and he discovered a culture that was a doping culture and he decided that the only way he could be a
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champion was to dope. and i think that was an understandable, kind of conclusion to come to. what was, i suppose, a bit shocking was that after having very serious cancer and, you know, life-threatening, according to some reports, he came back from that and put banned performance enhancing drugs in his body. because, remember, his great defense at this time was, after what i've been through, do you think i would put that stuff in my body? and of course, everybody said, everybody bought that, because it was so plausible. so for lance to have actually doped after cancer was a pretty tough thing to do. and i think it indicated a win-at-all-costs attitude that was far from commendable. but he regrets it now, hopefully, because it was a seriously wrong thing to do. >> fascinating conversation with
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david walsh there. still ahead, a flu shot that could protect you for years. we'll take you inside the government lab where groundbreaking science is happening right now. make 70,000. ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it.
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health officials are urging anyone who hasn't been vaccinated yet to get a flu shot now. many people get one every year, but that could soon change with a flu shot that can protect you for multiple years. cnn's brian todd got a look inside the government lab where work on a universal flu shot is happening now. brian? >> joe and kate, the flu virus kills about 500,000 people around the world every year. as we know, this year there's a particularly bad strain of it going around. but government researchers are furiously working on something they call a universal flu vaccine that could combat different strains of the flu for years to come. and this place is at the cutting edge. it's not a pandemic this year, but as always, it causes serious illness and even death. a big part of the problem, vaccines that can't keep up with the flu virus. >> why isn't the flu vaccine that we're getting now as effective as it should be? >> people get exposed to influenza, more or less, every
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year. but the influenza virus itself generally changes a little bit. it drifts. >> reporter: not like illnesses that we get childhood vaccines for, like measles or polio, according to dr. anthony fauci, head of the u.s. government's institute of allergy and infectious diseases. he took us inside the lab that could be turning that battle in our favor. the vaccine research center at nih, where measure a dozen top minds are developing a universal flu vaccine. if they nail it -- >> then you'll have a vaccine that you can give to someone and not worry about those little changes from year to year. and you'll have a response, you may need to give it every few years, every five years, every ten years, but you won't have to give it every year and have to chase after those little changes. >> but fauci says it means changing the plan of attack. this is the flu virus. on it are a bunch of proteins called hemoglobins. blown up, they look like this.
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the flu virus only attacks the head, which changes from year to year, so of the universal vaccine being developed at this lab is to attack not only the head, but the stem, which doesn't change. so if they can induce a response that attacks the stem, they can combat multiple strains of the flu for years to come. a crucial step takes place in the tissue culture room. >> what you see here are studies where we have actually grown the flu virus in culture and we're taking human serum specimens, blood specimens, and we're asking if we've taught the immune system to make antibodies to the conserved region of the virus. >> reporter: when ready, the universal vaccine won't eradicate the flu. >> but i think you're going to have a significant impact on the incidence of influenza as well as the degree of protection. >> reporter: how far out are we from people like you and me being able to actually get the
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universal flu vaccine? the doctor says it won't be next year but it also won't be 40 years from now. he says realistically, maybe in a decade but if they can accelerate it, maybe sooner. joe and kate? >> brian todd, thank you. right now, the house is debating a bill funding disaster relief for people hurt by super storm sandy, but there's some criticism that some of the money is going for the wrong things. erin burnett is taking a closer look at that at the top of the hour. what are you looking into? >> you know, it's amazing, they sometimes can't seem to stop themselves when it comes to this. but $2 billion of this sandy aid, some of it is going to highway repair. some of that will be in of course stricken areas. some of it will go to guam, as one republican said, that is in a very different ocean than the one where sandy was even spawned. then there's money going to fix amtrak in the northeast corridor. only about a third of that money, though, is actually going to parts of amtrak that were damaged during super storm sandy. two-thirds of the money is going to completely unrelated repairs. so this is why a lot of
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lawmakers are very angry about the sandy bill. we do expect a vote sometime in the next hour on whether this is going to pass or not. we will be joined by a congressman who has been taking on john boehner on some of these things and will be voting no on this bill. we will talk to him about why he's doing that. we are also going to be talking about the history of the nra. i'm really excited about this. so curious bhow the nra got to e so powerful. it is one of the most powerful lobbying organizations in this country. a few decades ago it was lobbying for increased gun control. now it's become a much more absolutist organization. the history of the nra, exciting and fascinating. that's coming up, top of the hour. >> erin burnett, "outfront" top of the hour. see you soon. still ahead, bill clinton's talking about his wife's health. you want to hear what he has to say about that. and jeanne moos has a fish story about the one that got away. ever.
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closing prayer at the inauguration. an atlanta pastor was scheduled to participate but had to withdraw after a controversy over an anti-gay sermon he delivered years ago. despite hillary clinton's comeback after last month's bout with the flu followed by a concussion from a fall and then of course the blood clot in her head, there has been plenty of speculation about her health. today, you could call a pretty knowledgeable source weighed in. >> she's always been very, very healthy and she has very low blood pressure, very low standing heartbeat. i tell her she's still got time to have three more husbands after me. she will live to be 120. i always know that she's thinking about that whenever i am stubborn about something, in my constant quest at self-improvement. she refers to me as her first husband. because i told her once she's going to live to be 120 and have time for plenty more.
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anyway, my advice is that she should rest up and decide what she wants to do with the rest of her life. >> she will definitely have time to rest up soon. that was bill clinton, of course, speaking today in california at his second annual conference entitled health matters, activating wellness in every generation. are you the king of bleeding heart who goes fishing and ends up feeling sorry for the fish? i do. >> no. i don't. well, then you can share the outrage over a video that's getting more than a nibble. cnn's jeanne moos shows us why it's going viral. >> reporter: the fish were biting, all right. biting this guy's arm. though this looks like a fish eats man story, experts say it's really a tale of man molests fish. dr. aaron adams is an official of a tarpin conservation organization. the tarpin is so legendary,
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michelangelo painted one chasing jonah on the sealing of the sistine chapel. this is no chapel. it's the florida keys, famous as a place to hand feed the tarpins. if this video is from robby's, management wants nothing to do with it. an angry employee told us he is truly molesting that animal. tell me what is wrong with this video. >> oh, boy. where do i start. he stuck his arm, his fist, into the fish's gills which i'm sure caused permanent damage and killed the fish. there's no way that fish survived. >> reporter: the tarpin has teeth rather than being razor sharp, they're more like sand paper. some compare this to noodling, also known on animal planet as -- >> hillbilly hand fishing. >> reporter: people use their hands to catch catfish by the mouth. >> hang on! >> reporter: sometimes giant catfish, but catfish are okay to catch and eat. tarpin are protec